Interviews

August 25, 2020

MMA Featured in AIA: Architecture in Turbulent Times: Spotlight on sustainability

MMA's own Megan Feenstra Wall was interviewed by the AIA.
November 30, 2019

Tom Mathison Featured on the Cover of Great Lakes by Design Magazine

Thanks to Great Lakes by Design for featuring our own Tom Mathison on the cover of their "Architects" edition in 2019.
March 19, 2019

Airport Pavilion Featured in The Golf Explorer Magazine!

Thanks to “The Golf Explorer” Magazine for featuring the Gerald R. Ford International Airport (GFIA) and its Viewing Park, which was designed by MMA, in their 2019 edition!  ## The GFIA Viewing Park, owned by the airport and located at 4820 KraftAvenue SE in Grand Rapids, has served as a popular place for local residents, families, visitors, and aviation enthusiasts alike since it first opened in 1995. Initially a park featuring a long, serpentine-shaped parking lot and cul-de-sac with picnic tables where visitors could capture the drama of flight as planes roared down the East-West runway, the site has been transformed and elevated with a simple, yet carefully detailed structure designed by Mathison | Mathison Architects, or MMA, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “This goes back to the primary kind of architecture: it is shelter. It has columns, the building is telling you what it is doing, it is directing rain, and it has this kind of purity as a structure,” said Ben Franceschi, architect at MMA. MMA, a full-service architectural firm grounded in modernism, is a practice striving to deliver projects that embrace its site, enrich its surrounding environment, and provide meaningful authentic experiences. Thomas R. Mathison, FAIA, principal and […]
December 5, 2018

MMA Earns the Cover of Grand Rapids Magazine!

Thanks to the Grand Rapids Magazine for featuring both our Deer Haven House and our Romence house in their December 2018 issue. We were excited to see our Deer Haven House on the cover. The issue is available at newsstands around Grand Rapids now! “At first glance, passersby might not assume that two homes — one on a large, secluded plot in the woods of Cascade, the other on a small lot in residential Grand Rapids — have much in common beyond a modern façade. They would be surprised to discover, however, that the homes, while unique in their own ways, share striking similarities once you step through their thresholds.” Read more of an excerpt of the article found online HERE. Read more about Deer Haven House HERE and Romence House HERE
October 17, 2018

Westshore Community College Master Planning in the News

Thanks to The Pioneer Group newspaper for including thorough coverage of the master planning meeting at Westshore Community College led by our own Tom Mathison.

"The West Shore Community College Board of Trustees and administration heard a report on Monday from Mathison Architect’s  Tom Mathison, who handles the college’s Facilities Master Plan which has to be filed with the State of Michigan giving them the opportunity to secure funding for building projects.

Mathison has handled this duty for the college for the past 18 years, since 2000 when he was with the TowerPinkster Firm. He continued to provide those services when he established his own firm and annually reviews WSCC’s facilities and infrastructure for the Facilities Master Plan.

“I appreciate the opportunity to work with the college on its facilities master plan,” said Mathison. “We have seen the college grow and mature in the time we have worked with you.”

December 9, 2017

Dwell Names Deer Haven House “Best Modern Home”

Dwell editors chose MMA's Deer Haven House as a "Best Modern Home".

Deer Haven House is located in Grand Rapids, MI and was build for a busy, growing family of five. It is a 3,000 sq ft home conceived as a narrow bars of space that follow and step down with the subtle contours of the site and unfold to the South to take advantage of the daily path of the sun and natural site air movements. Nestled into its wooded 1-acre setting, the building carefully occupies the space between the ground and the tree canopy with an unfolding spatial sequence that connects the occupants to both through extensions of the ground plane and manipulation of clerestory light.